Erin Myers Memorial Scholarship Fund

About a year and a half ago, our friend Erin Myers passed away after a mighty battle against colorectal cancer. It is not extraordinary that her fight ended the way it did. It was extraordinary the way she fought so hard for so long. Just a month before she passed she was on stage in the middle of full-on battle scenes in Babes With Blades’ production of Titus Andronicus, and before that the whole Chicago theatre community saw her as Odd Job Alice in the Hypocrites’ 12-hour marathon All Our Tragic… all while undergoing treatment. Her disease took its toll, but it could not touch her talent, or her love for her art.

Fans of WildClaw will remember Erin from her role as the Mother in Carmilla, and from appearances in several Deathscribe pieces including 2011’s Bloody Axe Award winner, Alabama Mermaid.

On top of being a gifted actress and opera-trained singer, Erin was an exceptional writer. She chronicled her fight in her blog, The View From the 21st Floor. On Monday, December 5th, colleagues and classmates from Kent State University, where Erin earned her MFA in Acting, performed a selection of readings from Erin’s blog. The reading was to support the Erin Myers Memorial Scholarship, which was created to continue and celebrate Erin’s love of theatre and live performance, which was nurtured and refined at Kent State. It will provide recognition and financial support to students enrolling in the BA, BFA, or MFA program in any area of study at the School of Theatre and Dance.

As you consider your end-of-the-year giving, we at WildClaw ask that you remember the Erin Myers Memorial Scholarship. You can make your donation at ksu.convio.net/erinmyers. All donations are tax deductible.

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Darkness has descended upon the 9th annual festival of horror radio plays. Congratulations to Travis Williams, who took home this year’s Coveted Bloody Axe Award for The Quake. This was Travis’ fourth time as a Deathscribe finalist.

And let us all bow down to the recipient of this year’s Cursed Skull of the Ancients, Sara Sevigny, for her record-breaking third win as a Deathscribe director.

quakecast

Special thanks are in order for the following sponsors of Deathscribe 2016:

High Hat Club
Peak Properties
Pointin Stil
Green Mill Cocktail Lounge
The Comb
Ward Eight

Thanks also to our new venue, Lincoln Hall… we hope we didn’t leave too much of a mess.

And a gargantuan thank you to all the artists who generously gave of their time and talent to make this year’s event possible. We could not have done it without you.

Deathscribe is an annual event that takes place on the first Monday of every December. Coming up next for WildClaw: THE WOMAN IN BLACK, opening March 24th at the Den Theatre. More information to come!

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

The Quake

By Travis Williams
Directed by Sara Sevigny
Featuring Linsey Falls and Corbette Pasko

After the earthquake, Briggs and Jackie went out in the woods. But just because they brought the guns doesn’t mean they’re the ones doing the hunting…

Travis Williams is incredibly excited and honored to be part of WildClaw Theatre’s Deathscribe for a fourth time as a finalist! His previous Deathscribe works include The Wall, Strange Weather, and Back in Baby’s Arms. Travis is co-creator and writer for the web comics Revenge Girl with artist John Wright and The Adventures of Lock and Rat with artist Angel Onofre. Travis is a featured writer in Famous Monster Magazines anthology, Tales from the Akermansion, with his short comic Unraveled co-created with artists Jonathan La Mantia. He is also currently developing an original web series The Park with Adam Hinkle & Stone Soup Theatre Project. For more information follow Travis on Twitter @Travisdmw or visit his website TravisWilliams.info – Much love to my wife Elizabeth!

Recently WildClaw’s resident Mistress of Malevolence Ele Matelan transfixed this year’s Deathscribe finalists with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she conjured from Travis Williams:

How did you get into horror? What excites you most about writing horror, compared to other genres?

I got into horror because of my grandmother and my mother. My grandma introduced me to all things Stephen King because she was actually a member of his fan/bookclub and read all of his works. Whenever I’d stay at her house and we’d go to Blockbuster to look at movies she would always introduce me to some of her favorite films including “Pet Cemetery”, “Amityville Horror”, and others.

My Mom was the one that introduced me to “Pumpkin Head” “The Leprechaun” “Tales from the Crypt” and the Holy Grail of horror films – “The Exorcist” that one did a number on me, but it made me fascinated with the genre.

I enjoy writing horror because it’s fun. Also because it’s character driven and incredibly versatile! Horror can make you laugh, cry, and get your skin to crawl all at the same time. It’s a genre that people always come back to no matter who the actor is in the movie, or who produced it, or who wrote it… it’s all about the scare and exploring the dark of humanity. It’s universal.

What was the hook for you in this story? What came first, the story or the sound?

The hook for me was kids in the woods coming across monsters. The woods are a scary place and I wanted to write about encountering the monsters that would scare the hell out of me.

I actually wrote this as a short comic that was illustrated by John Wright. I adapted the comic into a radio play which was a really fun exercise and I’m excited to see how it ended up.

What do you consider the biggest challenge in writing for “radio,” compared to traditional theatre?

The biggest challenge is using sound to create location, environment, and mood for your characters to play around with. Exposition is hard in radio too. You need to be very decisive in how you dole out information and how much you leave to the imagination.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?

There are so many possibilities here… I think hearing what teeth grinding on concrete sounds like would be a gross thing to hear and witness.

Do you have any advice for aspiring Deathscribes?

Let sound and character paint your landscape. Also, like music, try building toward a crescendo.

What scares you?

Bugs, snakes, guns, and walking down a dark quiet street with someone walking toward me.

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

I Let Them Out

By Julia Everitt
Directed by Gaby Labotka
Featuring Ada Grey and Mandy Walsh*

The little girl in pigtails said they were going to kill her so she let them out and now it’s time for the fun to begin. Is it all in her head or in yours?

Gaby Labotka is an actor, director, storyteller, choreographer, and more living and working in the city of Chicago. Most recently she directed [Trans]formation now playing at Collaboraction Studios, presented by The Living Canvas and Nothing Without a Company. Gaby was also the fight choreographer for Battleaxe Betty presented by ATC’s CORE Series, and she directed, curated, and hosted Fight Night: Valkyries for Nothing Special Productions. She has assistant directed for the House Theatre of Chicago (The Rose and the Rime, The Crownless King, The Magnificents) and Mary-Arrchie Theatre Co. (GEOGRAPHY OF A HORSE DREAMER); directed for play festivals hosted by Indie Boots, Nothing Special Productions, Otherworld Theatre Company, Hobo Junction, and Mary-Arrchie; and directed The Living Canvas: Rain in 2011. Gaby graduated from Illinois State University with degrees in Acting and Directing with the honor of Exceptional Merit in the Arts and recently attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London. She is incredibly excited to take on directing for Deathscribe as her first gig with WildClaw Theatre. Check out more: facebook.com/GabyLabotka.Theatre.

Recently WildClaw’s resident Queen of Cacophony Ele Matelan transfixed the directors of Deathscribe 2016 with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she exorcised from Gaby Labotka:

What excites you most about directing horror, compared to other genres?

The stakes are high, and although fantastical/fictional these stories speak to our truths and human fears. I like being able to lean into fiction to find truth.

What do you consider the biggest challenge in directing for “radio,” compared to traditional theatre?

Sound is arguably my weakest aspect as a director, I rely so much on my sound designer to interpret… what I have interpreted. But in radio, the whole composition is sound and it’s challenged me to listen in order to “see” the shape of the world we are experiencing. I like flexing this muscle.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?


I don’t know! I’m excited to see what we’re going to hear on the 5th!

What scares you?

Heights. L’appel du vide…

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

Dead Ringer

By Tim Griffin
Directed by Aileen McGroddy
Featuring Dave Fink, Lee Brophy and Darren Hill

Father Ronan gave his sermon in the cemetery that night as Fergus and Doyle drank over the lonely resting place of Patrick Cahill. And as the fog rolled in, they told the tale of the strange bell on his grave and wondered if they did indeed hear something…

Tim Griffin’s horror radio play Imaginary Fiend tied for Second Place in Deathscribe 2015, and has also been chosen for Wildclaw’s Best of Deathscribe, to be performed at Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago and the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, FL. His writing work includes stage plays Deadworry, Ticklebrains, Murder in Mirthburg, Closer to Free, and Re: Alice, as well as the short films Snare and The Cellar Job, and the full-length creature feature Tail Sting. A graduate of Illinois State University Theater, Tim has performed on stage and/or screen in Chicago, Los Angeles, Dublin, and Moscow, and is also an accomplished musician and fight choreographer. He is of indeterminate age and is currently at large.

Recently WildClaw’s resident Mistress of Malevolence Ele Matelan transfixed this year’s Deathscribe finalists with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she conjured from Tim Griffin:

How did you get into horror?

Edward Gorey and The Twilight Zone (Rod Serling/Richard Matheson/Charles Beaumont) were my “gateways” at age 9. After that, everything else.

What excites you most about writing horror, compared to other genres?

What’s fun about writing horror, especially short horror, is that it encourages the writer to be economical. Most horror writers’ best work is their short fiction (Poe, Lovecraft, King, Barker), and it may be because they don’t get bogged down in superfluous filler. Good short horror fiction is, by its very nature, concise, and is often more powerful (and scarier) because of it. I’ll bet there’s some manner of applicable metaphor about the jugular, but it escapes me at the moment…

What was the hook for you in this story? What came first, the story or the sound?

I guess the sound came first… a desperate bell in a graveyard on an autumn night. But moreso, the silence beforehand: the absence of the bell, and the horrible anticipation – the dread – of it ringing, I’ve thought a few times that this play’s pauses are just as important as its speeches, in slowly building the fear.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?

Something squishy.

Do you have any advice for aspiring Deathscribes?

Have fun (and other vague words of encouragement so as not to reveal my tricks to the competition)!

What scares you?

Sharks. I think that’s completely reasonable.

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

The Woman Below

By Daniel Dauphin
Directed by Jessica Mondres
Featuring Mari Marroquin, Rob Koon, and Pamela Maurer

Alice McKellan of the salvage ship Trident found something spectacular at the bottom of the ocean that could change history and make them all very very rich indeed. Why, oh why, did she bring it on board?

Jessica Mondres is an interdisciplinary theater artist with a background in performance and a focus on prop/puppet design, directing, puppetry, and installation/video art. Recent design credits include work at Red Orchid, Victory Gardens, Cock and Bull, Strawdog, and 16th Street Theater’s season 9 productions of Yasmina’s Necklace, Book Club Play, and Carroll Gardens. She also directed and performed in 16th Street’s remount of Mariposa Nocturna; for which she designed an immersive lobby installation and created a short stop-motion film. She is the co-founder of Portmanteau, a new experimental object based performance project, and a proud 16th Street Theater Associate Artist. Up next is prop design for Iolanthe at Gilbert and Sullivan Opera Company and development of Portmanteau’s new piece, T(w)o Marias, with the support of a DCASE In the works residency.

Recently WildClaw’s resident Queen of Cacophony Ele Matelan transfixed the directors of Deathscribe 2016 with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she exorcised from Jessica Mondres:

What do you consider the biggest challenge in directing for “radio,” compared to traditional theatre?

A lot of my directing experience has been rooted in dance or movement based performance, sometimes in dumb show, where visual story telling takes precedence over narrative. So it will be a fun challenge to switch that up and really focus on layering Ele’s amazing foley effects, the music, and the voices of our talented cast to aurally paint pictures in people’s minds that (hopefully) scare them silly. Danny’s script has this wonderfully creeping psychological dread built into it and I’m looking forward to bringing it to life in the imagination of the audience and creating a strong sense of being there with the characters as they go through this nightmare.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?

This is a really good but hard to answer question, because I’m excited about so many of them. I can think of a number of especially fun ones in Danny’s script I’m really looking forward to hearing, but maybe it’s spoilers to tell you what they are right now. I’m going to have to go with any sound created through the destruction of vegetables. It’s such a classic foley effect, and so theatrical too. I imagine it must be really satisfying, for example, to just destroy a cabbage on stage.

What scares you?

I used to have really vivid, recurring nightmares about bears. I haven’t had one in a long time, but bears still scare the shit out of me. Something about them just seems so alien and terrifying. You know that Werner Herzog documentary Grizzly Man? Herzog says when he looks at the bears he sees “no kinship, no understanding, no mercy… only the overwhelming indifference of nature.” He might as well have been reading from my dream journal. The Teddy Bear is a lie.

What was the first horror story to really, really mess with your head?

When I was a kid, I was seriously traumatized by the third vignette in the Stephen King movie Cat’s Eye, which I saw on television. In the movie an evil troll moves into a little girl’s house, stabs her pet parakeet to death, and then tries to steal her breath. Her pet cat ultimately saves her from the evil troll.

I did not have a pet cat.

Naturally, I spent years convinced that there was also an evil troll living in my walls who wanted to kill me in my sleep. I had all these elaborate bedtime rituals to keep myself safe from the troll. I’d invent rules for how to stay safe, like if I had my doll Abigail in bed with me they couldn’t get me. If I followed the rules I would be ok. But I had to make three new rules every night and then recite all the old rules too. I knew if I didn’t follow every single rule the troll would get me, so I couldn’t afford to forget any of them.

After years of doing this you can imagine that it got a bit ridiculous. By the end the evil troll was suspended in a steel prison in my ceiling with laser beams, and he had gotten pretty stupid and easy to fool. There was even a good troll who had moved into the walls to help me out. Because I still didn’t have a cat.

I am too embarrassed to tell you how old I was when I finally stopped doing all of this.

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

I Let Them Out

By Julia Everitt
Directed by Gaby Labotka
Featuring Ada Grey and Mandy Walsh*

The little girl in pigtails said they were going to kill her so she let them out and now it’s time for the fun to begin. Is it all in her head or in yours?

Julia Everitt is a junior at the University of Iowa pursuing degrees in English on the Creative Writing track and Economics with a minor in Theatre Arts. Her play, Take Me Home, was a part of the 2016 University of Iowa’s Undergraduate Ten Minute Play Festival. Julia enjoys reading and watching plays and has seen 119 plays and counting. She is currently a co-captain for the University of Iowa Waterski and Wakeboard Team and former vice president of the University of Iowa Cosplay Club. Her ambition is to become a well-known playwright.

Recently WildClaw’s resident Mistress of Malevolence Ele Matelan transfixed this year’s Deathscribe finalists with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she conjured from Julia Everitt:

How did you get into horror? What excites you most about writing horror, compared to other genres?

The funny thing is although I enjoy writing horror, I refuse to watch horror movies or tv shows or anything like that because I get scared super easily. Sometimes while I’m writing something meant to be scary I’ll end up scaring myself.

Writing horror is fun for me because you know it is going to be exciting and suspenseful. You’re allowed to keep secrets from the audience in horror in a way that isn’t as permissible in other genres.

What was the hook for you in this story? What came first, the story or the sound?

I actually first wrote this piece as a fiction piece and then converted it into a radio drama from there. I don’t normally write fiction so that was a bit weird for me and I worked really hard with the formatting of it to convey the mood of it that I wanted. When I converted it to radio, it got a lot easier. Instead of needing multiple fonts sizes and such silliness it was easier to give it to actual characters to say. So, while I’d say the story came first, the story was always meant to have a very specific sound to it.

What do you consider the biggest challenge in writing for “radio,” compared to traditional theatre?

Radio is different from theatre in that you know the actors aren’t going to be seen. If you want your audience to “see” something you’re going to have to describe it, which can sometimes sound unnatural because we usually expect the people we’re talking to to be able to see what we see. I’d say the trickiest part about writing for radio would be helping the audience see your story without it becoming unnatural.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?

Maybe… squishing? Squishing is always creepy.

Do you have any advice for aspiring Deathscribes?

Just do it. I always think the hardest part of writing is to actually just do the writing. Other than that, just be creepy, man.

What scares you?

Everything? Haha. Walking home alone late at night, the monster in my attic, frat boys, ketchup – you name it, it probably scares me.

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

The Quake

By Travis Williams
Directed by Sara Sevigny
Featuring Linsey Falls and Corbette Pasko

After the earthquake, Briggs and Jackie went out in the woods. But just because they brought the guns doesn’t mean they’re the ones doing the hunting…

Sara Sevigny is a Chicago-based actor, singer, improviser, writer, and director of festivals or one night only events. A full run? You’ve lost your mind. This is third stint as director with Deathscribe, where she was triumphant last year directing Robyn Coffin and Jennifer Santanello in Joseph Zettelmaier’s creepy-ass Earwigs and the previous year directing Noah Simon and Corrbette Pasko in Christopher M. Walsh’s winning piece, Fracture Zone. Oh yeah. BRING IT! She loves travel, overly dramatic karaoke, writing with her comedy partner Corrbette Pasko, and fighting zombies. You’ll thank her. TV credits include 20th Century Fox’s Empire and The Gabriels, and ABC’s Mindgames. She and Corri have donned: The League of Awesome (2010), Autumn Leaves (2014), Thirty Days in the Rabbit Hole (Abbie Hoffman Festival, 2014), Foil (2015), and the awesome Zombie Broads (Fall 2016). They also have a YouTube channel Unsolicited Jews that you should totally like and a webseries Corri and Sara are Famous. Pretty damn swanky. A proud member of the Actor’s Equity Association and SAG-AFTRA, you can check our her credits on her website. relsav.wix.com/sarasevigny. I mean we’re here for horror. Let’s stay focused. Sara currently resides as an ensemble member and playwright with The Factory Theater in Chicago. Hailing from Evanston, Illinois, Sara graduated with her BA in Theatre/Communications from Curry College, trained at the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco, and graduated Second City’s Conservatory program.

Recently WildClaw’s resident Queen of Cacophony Ele Matelan transfixed the directors of Deathscribe 2016 with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she exorcised from Sara Sevigny:

What additional projects do you have, previous or pending, that you’d like to brag about?

Thru Nov 26th Zombie Broads is playing at The Factory Theater the I cowrote with Corrbette Pasko. I’m can be seen randomly on Empire as Edna the board member. Which is awesome. Have a web series called, ‘Corri and Sara are Famous’ that is currently in production, and a YouTube series called ‘Get in the Car’ that she and Corrbette put up randomly onto their channel Unsolicited Jews.

What excites you most about directing horror, compared to other genres?

Any good horror story is bordering a situational comedy. Not the three camera laugh track one, but a single camera dramedy that has quirky characters you care about that may speak with such comedic rhythm that you want to be their friend immediately. And then all of a sudden it’s not. Funny. It’s not funny at all. I love that.

What do you consider the biggest challenge in directing for “radio,” compared to traditional theatre?

The biggest challenge is creating the same experience for those watching and for those just listening. Honoring the genre is the most gratifying part. When the foley artists, actors, and band are all having a conversation with each other magic can happen.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?

I think we haven’t had enough space horror. I would to see that. Or in a cave. OH MAYBE A VOLCANO MONSTER.

What scares you?

What doesn’t scare me! Ya know what doesn’t scare me? Puppies. Everything else has the potential to scare the crap outta me.

What question do you wish I’d asked, and how would you answer it?

Ha ummmm… I’m an Aquarius. I’m addicted to outdoor pools, and I love unsweetened green tea lemonade. It tastes like sunshine.

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

The Woman Below

By Daniel Dauphin
Directed by Jessica Mondres
Featuring Mari Marroquin, Rob Koon, and Pamela Maurer

Alice McKellan of the salvage ship Trident found something spectacular at the bottom of the ocean that could change history and make them all very very rich indeed. Why, oh why, did she bring it on board?

Daniel Dauphin is a Chicago-based actor, writer, illustrator, and fight choreographer. He was a co-writer and actor in Big Bad, his first feature-length film, which was released this summer on Amazon and iTunes. In Chicago, he has worked as an actor with Organic Theatre Company, Stage Left, Steep, and Red Theatre Chicago, and he’s provided fight choreography for Neo-Futurists, Eclectic Theatre Company, and ph Comedy. He’d like to thank his wife for her love and support, and apologize to his newborn daughter for maybe introducing her to horror films too soon.

Recently WildClaw’s resident Mistress of Malevolence Ele Matelan transfixed this year’s Deathscribe finalists with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she conjured from Daniel Dauphin:

How did you get into horror? What excites you most about writing horror, compared to other genres?

I’ve been a horror fanatic ever since I was a child. My mother got me hooked, as no one else in my family enjoyed watching horror films, so I was her only backup. If things got too gory, she’d hide her eyes behind a pillow, and I’d have to tell her what was happening on screen. Assuming that I wasn’t also hiding behind a pillow. As soon as I was old enough to ride my bike to the video store, or to pick up a copy of Fangoria magazine from the 7-11, it was all downhill from there.

Now the easy answer to “what excites me about writing horror” is that it’s just incredible fun. But I also think it’s interesting how it seems like the genre of storytelling that has the most staying power. A good horror story influences your behavior for hours afterward. Perhaps even a lifetime. Whether it’s just a reluctance to turn out the lights at night, or a lifelong aversion to swimming in open water, horror has staying power that’s just fascinating.

What was the hook for you in this story? What came first, the story or the sound?

For “The Woman Below,” the sound came first. I’d never written for radio before and when I started kicking around ideas, the starting point, for better or worse, was what could I write that literally sounded interesting. I hadn’t listened to a lot of radio horror before starting, and I’ve since discovered a lot of effective horror that didn’t center on that notion, so it’s not necessarily how I’d start again. But for this go-round, it’s what worked for me. As far as actual story content goes, ever since Jaws, any horror story set on or near the water works for me. Two of the biggest nightmare elements are isolation and powerlessness, and the middle of the ocean is the perfect spot for both.

What do you consider the biggest challenge in writing for “radio,” compared to traditional theatre?

Without a doubt, it’s the exposition. Sound design obviously carries a lot of weight on creating the setting and conveying the action, but since I wasn’t writing this with a sound designer handy, it was hard to judge as to what I could (or should) depend on from the foley artist vs. what I’d have to specify for a listener. It definitely affected how many characters I felt I needed to make a scene work.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?

I’ve got an idea that I almost chased down that would involve a fair amount of industrial noise and crowd chatter. So it would be awfully convenient if there someone did a story in such a setting to sort of guinea pig the possibilities for me so I’d know if it was worth putting that one on paper.

Do you have any advice for aspiring Deathscribes?

There’s a ton of radio horror out there. Dig it up and give it a listen. If I learned anything from it, it’s that two voices in the darkness can be just as effective as a cacophony of sound, so long as the characters are interesting. Good storytelling is always good storytelling.

Also, just do the damn thing. Don’t drag your feet. Just do it.

What scares you?

The long, slow end of the world. I’m dreading the day I read the headline, for real, that says “all the bees have died”. “There’s a genuine global coffee shortage.” That sort of thing. What one thing is going to kick off the rest of civilization into Mad Max territory?

Also dolls. Dolls creep me out.

What question do you wish I’d asked, and how would you answer it?

What’s your favorite short, scary story? “The Jaunt,” by Stephen King. It’s longer than you think.

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WildClaw Theatre Company proudly presents Deathscribe 2016, the Ninth Annual International Festival of Radio Horror Plays on Monday, December 5th, at 8:00pm. This collection of bone-chilling audio nightmares will be performed live at Deathscribe’s NEW VENUE, Lincoln Hall, 2424 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

Dead Ringer

By Tim Griffin
Directed by Aileen McGroddy
Featuring Dave Fink, Lee Brophy and Darren Hill

Father Ronan gave his sermon in the cemetery that night as Fergus and Doyle drank over the lonely resting place of Patrick Cahill. And as the fog rolled in, they told the tale of the strange bell on his grave and wondered if they did indeed hear something…

Aileen McGroddy is a director, movement director, and clown. She is a founder of the Whiskey Rebellion, where she curates The Whiskey Radio Hour, a recurring night of new radio plays and live music. She is a Forks & Hope Ensemble member, where she most recently directed A Hero’s Journey. She is also a company member of TUTA, where she directed the TUTALab Have a Seat and movement directed Music Hall, The Anyway Cabaret, and The Jewels. Other recent directing credits include Ulysses (The Plagiarists), 10 Ways to Survive the Zombie Apocalypse and In This Final Century (Theatre-Hikes), Chicago Shorties (A.O. The Trunk Show), and MUTINY (Chicago Fringe Festival). She has also worked with The Hypocrites, The House Theatre, Court Theatre, Theatre Y, and Emerald City Theatre.

Recently WildClaw’s resident Maestro of the Macabre Ele Matelan fixed this year’s the directors of Deathscribe 2016 with her withering glare. Below are some of the answers she exorcised from Aileen McGroddy:

What do you consider the biggest challenge in directing for “radio,” compared to traditional theatre?

What’s exciting about directing for “radio” goes hand in hand with what is challenging about it. It’s about finding the right amount of information to convey that the audience’s imaginations can build the world in their heads, but not so much that they can’t fill in the gaps. In the live radio play format, there is this added layer of performative reality, which can be in conversation with the fictional reality in a really exciting way.

What sound would you most like to see/hear performed in a Deathscribe piece?

I would love to hear a journey through the human body, Magic School Bus-style, but scarier.

What additional projects do you have going on right now?

I’m Movement and Associate Directing The Snowy Day at Emerald City Theatre, and Movement Directing Gentle at TUTA.

What scares you?

The feeling of being alone but not quite sure of it.

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